"...the feedback is constructive so it lets you measure where you were and how you are growing and how far you've come. I thought that was great."

 

Akeem Iyanda

Law Clerk, Rosen Law

 

 

Transcript

My name is Akeem Iyanda. I recently graduated from the University of Waikato. I also recently finished my professional exams at The College of Law. I am now working as a law clerk here to Rosen Law. I enjoy meeting people and having interesting conversations. I do things from drafting documents such as affidavit or applications or to start court proceedings. I may also go to the courts with my boss Kathi Rosen and of course I don't speak in court but I take notes and perhaps write questions I do lots of interesting stuff.

What did you like most about studying at The College of Law?

It was the Instructors. During the on-site workshops, say the negotiation one or the client interview or the advocacy one. The advocacy one particularly I thought was really cool. The instructor you could tell that she has years of experience. She would guide you and she's patient as well and the feedback is constructive so it lets you measure where you were and how you are growing and how far you've come. I thought that was great.

How did you find the experience of online learning?

It’s different from what I was used to learning in the university so learning without necessarily having contact, personal contact of the person who's instructing you was a bit different so it took a bit of getting used to but once you get the hang of it I reckon you'll be fine.

Do you have any advice for students about to study Profs at The College of Law?

I would say put your time into it and also find a way to motivate yourself to do it because it was difficult re-motivating myself to restart learning and it was it was a bit hard but I would say anyone who wants to start now find a way to get past that. If you can you would find Pofs rather interesting.

Can you give an example of how the College helped balance work and study?

I made some mistake when I was a submitting my portfolio, I think that was civil litigation and by the time I found out I'd already started working by then so I was working full time but then had to resubmit the portfolio because I missed some part of it. I was allowed to submit it in my own time so I can come to work do my day job when I get back to my house I can work on it and then upload it so that was really great. It worked for me well.

How do you use the skills you learnt during Profs in your current role?

Now I do lots of drafting, so I write affidavits, I write applications. This morning I'd written a letter to Ranga tamariki, those things I've learnt then now I'm able to transfer them into what I'm doing now especially what I've just done this morning.

Would you recommend The College of Law’s Profs programme?

I would because the Instructors you work with, they have a lot of experience, they have a lot of knowledge to pass to you. Why wouldn't anyone want that?

If you could describe The College of Law in three words, what would they be?

I think the first one will be relevant, relevant in terms of what you learn, so you learn how to draft, you learn how to stand up on your feet and talk, you learn how to negotiate, you learn how to reason. I think all these things are what's relevant when you are in practice or when you started working in law environment, so relevant. I would also say thorough, thorough in the sense that when you put in your work you when you get your feedback you would be able to see that someone had gone through them with a fine comb looking at everything from spellings to grammar, you know formats, fonts and things like that. The third one would be perfectionist. I would say you have to get it right because people's life will be depending on what you're doing, your work so you have to get everything accurately, so yeah they won't let you go until you get everything to the tee.